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Prepping for Sweet Corn & Crust

One of life’s simple pleasures is getting out for skate skiing, touring or making turns on a warming bluebird day, with an inch or so of wet sweet corn on firm crust or solid base. Spring & summer predawn hikes on crust to harvest morning corn is right up there.

The best corn comes after a freeze of transformed, wet snow from the day before. The snow is no longer flakes or crystals, but saturated ice ‘kernels’ known as frozen corn. Depending on timing, aspect and other factors, this can start out like a coral reef, a very abrasive crust, sun-cupped, or ‘icy’, among other consistencies. As it melts and transforms again to wet corn, how do you prepare your boards to perform well all day in these variable conditions?

If you wax with a warmer & softer wax for the warmer, wet conditions, you can easily wear off the wax on highly abrasive, colder snows, while you wait for conditions to moisten and soften (or not). If you wax with cold wax, you may miss out on the best glide and enjoyment when it becomes prime time.

One option is to simply wait until conditions soften and you hit it when the conditions are best and wax accordingly. This may be easier said than done for some and as the unreliable weather can change, this plan may backfire.

We’ve found the best balance between ideal wax temperatures for glide and abrasive snows is to start with an aggressive base structure, wax with a very durable mid and broad temperature base liquid or solid wax like Briko-Maplus BP1 Violet or Colder and harder BP1 Blue or Green, and top it with a warm temp Low Fluoros like Briko-Maplus Universal Hot or LP2.

The base structure doesn’t seem to matter relative to the coarse, frozen snow, but makes a huge difference when the snow becomes saturated by channeling water and reducing suction. The durable base wax provides a longer and better protection for the bases and runs very well in a wide range of condition if the softer wax wears off. Depending on how the day goes, the LF wax may be perfect for the entire day and will provide an extra bump in glide.

Additionally, since it is a softer wax, it can easily be reapplied if desired or necessary by crayoning/rubbing on solids, wiping on cream/paste or liquids, or spraying (most convenient and durable option) high-melt waxes and then corking and polishing with a brush.

If you are concerned about an aggressive base structure and temperatures and snow type reverting towards colder, the harder waxes can be still utilized, but not brushed out of the structure as much as when you need the structure for water channeling. This will effectively ‘moderate’ the base structure to closer match the colder snows.

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Summer Storage Waxing after Pond Skimming

pond_skimmingNow that you skimmed the pond due to proper waxing and technique (and hopefully not your good gear) 😉 , it’s usually a sign for most that it’s time to put your boards in storage.

Following is a recent bulletin from Toko:

TECH BULLETIN
Source: Toko Brand Management Office, Heber City, UT info@TokoUS.com 866-TOKO-USA

Here are Toko’s recommendations for storage waxing of skis. First clean the
skis well. This can be done with wax remover or by simply brushing the bases
out well with a copper brush depending on how dirty they are. Then drip on a
generous amount of NF or LF Red. Iron it in making sure that there is enough
wax to provide a thick layer on the base and that the iron is hot enough to ensure
a good bond between the wax and the base. This ironing procedure is normal,
but sometimes a person rushes through storage waxing and the wax is not really
heated outside of that it becomes liquid. The ski bases often times don’t even
become warm. This will result in air between the base and the ski and less
protection.
Red is our choice for storage waxing as Blue is so hard that it is more difficult to
make sure that there is no air between the ski and base and Yellow is so soft that
it gets “eaten away” quicker. NF or LF Red is perfect because their consistency
is perfect.
If waxing Alpine skis, slop the wax over the edges and cover them too.
A SUMMARY:
1. Brush skis out well with Copper Brush
2. Iron in System3 Red or LF Red making sure adequate wax is used and
that the wax is heated in well.

See the Toko Information Center for more tips and helpful hints.

In addition to the aforementioned rationale for using a medium temperature wax versus soft/warm temperature wax for storage, it is more likely that it will be appropriate for the initial snow temps you’ll encounter next fall than the soft. In the fall/early winter, for those wishing to minimize extra steps, time and expense, you might be good to go by simply scraping, brushing.

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Waxing for the Week Ahead

Screen Shot 2016-01-15 at 2.31.50 PMThe San Juans of Colorado can have an air temperature change of up to 30 degrees/per day when the intense sun is out and depending on the aspect. When storm or weather systems flow through it can be over 50 degrees in a week, along with broad relative humidity swings. Waxing for the Week Ahead can drive you nuts if you enjoy optimal glide and are trying to determine what wax to use to achieve your goals, especially several days out for a trip or to not have to wax again until after several outings. Fortunately, the snow temperature changes at a much slower rate.

Screen Shot 2016-01-15 at 2.29.07 PM

Screen Shot 2016-01-15 at 2.29.23 PM

Fortunately, wax companies like Briko-Maplus & Toko base their wax temperature system on snow temperature which fluctuates far less dramatically. The downside is determining what the snow temperature will be.

I’ve had pretty good luck focusing on the overnight low trends and using a wax bracketing or below the low temperature forecasts. Generally, it is better to err towards colder than warmer waxes. To bump it up a notch, also considering the humidity level is also worthwhile. Also, the Briko-Maplus, among other waxes do perform well outside of their stated optimal temperature ranges. Experimenting over time will help you decide on what seems to work best for you. That said, everyone loves a ‘one size fits all’/’silver bullet’/all-temp answer, but like all-mountain skis, it may never be just right for any given set of conditions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ask yourself, ‘What is the typical low temperatures during the night?’ Use that as a ‘guide’ for snow temperatures. Get the wax or waxes that are optimal for that range, test drive and then tweak. If you are willing to spend all the time, energy and expense dialing in your quiver, why night dial in a wax quiver to optimize the performance of your gear and outings where your boards meet the snow. The higher the grade of wax, the higher the durability and could last over a handful of days, depending on how aggressive the snow is and the amount of vertical.

Relative to the above Forecast for the Low Temperatures and Humidity, the following options I’d consider the following options:

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Base Cleaning Hot Scrape or Cleaner??

(FAQ)
There is a school of thought that base cleaners/wax removers should never be used on the ski bases and hot scraping is the only method to employ for cleaning ski and snowboard bases. The thinking is cleaners will absolutely dry out the bases and destroy the wax saturation level and optimal glide achieved through repetitive wax cycles. How much wax is removed is highly variable from zero to a fair amount depending on duration, how aggressive is the cleaner and how much brushing and elbow grease is applied.

This is an ‘old wives tale’ or hearsay at work (that endlessly gets perpetuated on the internet and via word of mouth) when it comes to the debate over using cleaners vs. hot scraping with a soft wax. From a technical standpoint sintered bases are basically inert and do not bond well with anything. The surface of the base in contact with the snow is amorphous and random in nature. Structuring the base creates lines in the base material and establishes a pattern, but the underlying material is still amorphous and random.

Wax (or base cleaner for that matter) only penetrates a very small amount into the base, about 15 microns and only where random voids exist. 15 microns is a very small measurement (1% or so of base thickness~15 to 20 microns is about 0.0006 to 0.0008 inch). How can base cleaner possibly “dry out” the base if it only penetrates 15 microns? The answer quite simply is it doesn’t. Base cleaner, or at least Briko-Maplus base cleaner is basically detergent dissolved in a solvent. The solvent almost entirely evaporates and the detergent works to properly clean the base. When you take your dirty car to a car wash do you wax it first or clean it with detergent and then wax it? I’ve tried both and the later definitely seems to work better.

A distinction should be made between paraffin and perfluorinated waxes. A specific base cleaner called Fluorclean should be used to remove perfluorinated waxes as it is designed to remove all traces of fluorine from the base. Hot scraping at best blends new wax with a combination of old wax and contaminants in the old wax. I admit you will notice some contaminants being drawn out of the base when hot scraping if the base is dirty, but the iron is not a magnet and does not magically remove all contaminants using wax as a conduit. Residual wax left on the base after hot scraping will still have undesirable stuff in it.

Additionally, duration and type of cleaners can be employed judiciously to expedite and provide clean bases, ready for the next coat of wax. The longer a wax remover or solvent sits on the base, the more it can cut into the wax and any contaminates. Also, a more aggressive cleaner can also be used to remove the surface contaminants in little time and use of materials while eliminating the hot scraping steps and mess. Diluted (1:5) household cleaners like Simple Green can provide adequate cleaning. Biodegradable citrus based cleaners can be great options for cleaning the base and removing wax when harsher solvent based cleaners are not needed or desired. For base repairs, base cleaners are necessary, coupled with some sanding and cutting of the base material.

So, back to the original question. The best way to clean the bases is the method that is best for you, your preferences, time available, costs or beliefs: either hot scraping, base cleaner or a combination. If you are concerned about base cleaner remnants on the base, you can also hot scrape afterwards or simply wipe off with water.

A caveat to keep in mind is that skis and snowboards tend to run better and faster after more wax cycles and time on the snow. So, more aggressive cleaning would require more wax cycles to optimize the glide than a less aggressive, more topical cleaning.

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Base Prep, Brushing and Edge Bevels

From -Toko: Base Prep, Brushing and Edge Bevels Cheever and Willi Witz

Cheever on Base Prep and Brushing
Hello everyone, I wanted to do a myth busting eblast series. But I need to consult with the man before I attempt to blow everyones` mind. So instead for this early season eblast I want to talk about some base preparation and brushing. I should say, what I do for base prep and brushing…

My early season riding isn’t much different than most skiers and snowboarders. I’m on a glacier with varying conditions and trying to mimic racing as much as possible.

This time of the year usually calls for getting on a fast enough base that you can come close as possible to race speeds, but not slow down an actual race base. If you have the luxury of running a practice base… Awesome. But many people don’t, so you’ll be on your racers…or techs will be tuning racers.

It’s not quite panic time yet to worry about a structure you should have done a few weeks ago. With enough prep, your base will be brought to speed quickly. So it’s okay to carefully get on that racer. What I like to do with my race bases is make sure the wax is durable.
Duh… Put cold wax on the edges… But there is more to it.

Wax bonds to your base. Wax also bonds to other wax. My preseason routine is more than scraping off yellow then. Throwing on blue for durability.

I love toko red and the HF red. But let’s just stick with NF for now. Red can run in all conditions this time of the year. But more importantly it’s on my base as a bonder for any other temperature wax I’ll use for training. Before my snowboard gear is off I brush then iron on red. For my trainer board, I am comfortable just running with the red. But when I want to pull out a race deck, my routine starts the same with the red after I get off the hill, but I check my weather forecast and figure out what wax I want to bond with that red.

Say Pitztal is calling for colder weather and I am going to be in a blue/red range for tomorrow. I have my red on and methodically remove it.

Scrape. I scrape all the wax off. Scrape excess wax off my scrapers. ScotchBrite my scrapers clean so there is no gummy residue.

Brush step 1. Steely Dan. Toko’s oval steel brushes do the trick quite well for pulling the excess wax your scraper didn’t get and start pulling the residue from the structure of your base.

Brush step 2. Roto Horse hair. If you are subscribed to a toko eblast, I hope you have access to a roto brush. If not, I suggest investing. I use NO water for any roto brushing. The horse hair pulls most of the wax out of the base that you don’t need and leaves what you do need behind.

Brush step 3. Roto bronze. Now my roto bronze is used and is quite soft. It isn’t as aggressive as my horse hair, plus it’s used at a slower drill speed. No water here or for any roto brushing because water acts as a lubricant for brushing. If you want to pull excess wax out, the most efficient way to do it is without water.

Brush step 4. The grey toko board roto. This brush will remove just about any remnants that will slow me down and will leave what I need bonding to the board

Brush step 5. Toko’s black nylon roto. You want to polish that base and make it shine.

Brush step 6. If you have a paint brush, new of course, kicking around. Clean the tip and tail of your stick as they probably collected excess from brushing.

Step 7. Fiberlene. This final step microstructures your wax and cleans up excess junk left on the surface of your base.

Now that you know how I brush… Maybe after you put your next layer on try my method… Now I put on my red/blue combo for the next day. Repeat everything over once the wax is ready to be scraped. Roto brushing expedites the process and is more efficient than brushing by hand.

Go fast in training and faster racing,
Cheever
US Ski and Snowboard Tuning Legend Willi Wiltz on Prepping New Skis and Snowboards

US Ski and Snowboard Serviceman Legend Willi Wiltz on What Base and Edge Bevels to Use

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Not much has really changed since 1941

The more things change, the more things remain the same…..but get more complicated and expensive.

For training USA mountain troops in 1941. In this segment, we learn how to choose the proper ski length, how to choose and take care of boots, how to adjust bindings, how to care for ski edges and ski bottoms. Alan Ladd is one of the recruits.

 This clip from the Classic Film: The Basic Principles of Skiing

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Efficient Hot Waxing, Scraping and Brushing

Following, are two videos, a few minutes long, showing various hot waxing techniques, along with minimal scraping and roto-brushing to bang out waxing tasks in little time and with little mess. Not including cooling and hardening time (20 minutes, minimum) the total time involved could be easily under 15 minutes and possibly 10 per pair or snowboard. Using liquid wax, the time could be 5 minutes:
(Note select the ‘HQ’ icon for Higher Quality video.)

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Cool! New boards! Now what????

You just got some new skis or a snowboard. Now what?

Unwrap & drool, then inspect them to ‘get to know’ them

  • Check bases for flatness with a true bar and backlighting
  • Look for consistent base structure and for any gouges
  • Eyeball torsional squareness and general structure evenness
  • Measure the side and base bevels and record info
  • Check general consistent sharpness of the edges and for burrs or nicks. Also, check for rust
  • Detune the tips and tails around the shovel until they are no longer sharp and catch objects
  • Make any necessary (hopefully none or minor) fixes and tweaks
  • Clean, wax, scrape and brush a few cycle
  • Ski or ride ’em, repeat above and make any edge bevel tweaks deemed appropriate and test again

Periodically repeat above

willi

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New 2014 World Speed Ski Record Set on Briko-Maplus Wax

Tamtam Photo - Simone Origone recordman de la piste_1000_72dpiOn March 31st 2014, Simone Origone broke his 2006 World Speed Ski Record by skiing almost 100mph faster than a car traveling down the highway at 60mph! He reached 252.45kmh/157.87mph in the Italian Alps on Briko-Maplus race wax and super aerodynamic gear. Congratulations to Simone and Briko-Maplus waxes and technicians.

The waxes on his skis:

Briko-Maplus Racing Base: SM 40.60 World Cup Reserved
Briko-Maplus Fluoro Paraffin: HP3 Yellow2 (Race Choice) 80% + LP2 Green (Hardener) 20%
Briko-Maplus Perfluorinated Overlay: FP4 Hot-S Spray (Accelerator)

For a video of the World Speed Record:

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Glide Waxing and Anti-Icing Backcountry Climbing Skins

As counter-intuitive as it sounds, glide waxing climbing skins improves efficiency while backcountry touring. By improving the glide and preventing ice build-up and snow clumping, wax may quicken your pace while reducing effort. On rolling slogs improving the speed you carry on slight downhills is a nice benefit and in some cases, you won’t need to spend the time to remove skins for a short slope and then need reattach them.

Rub-on solids, paste, liquid and spray waxes are easy to apply and coat the skin fibers, but are short lived compared to hot waxing solid glide wax. Like adding heat to wax applications on skis and snowboards, you will typically achieve higher durability (read, longer glide). Of course there is the concern of adding too much heat and possibly damaging your skins or melting the skin glue. But by using as low of a temperature you can to melt and apply the wax of the day (same as on your ski or splitboard bases) to the skin, you can benefit from the easy process as shown in this Toko video. Follow it with a light brushing against the nap after the wax cools to open the nap again.

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Toko (Red Creek) Rotating Brush Instructions

User Guide for Rotating (Roto) Brushes

Important:

To protect the eyes we recommend the use of protective glasses whenever working with rotating brushes. Make sure no one is standing close to the drill without eye protection.

 

With the exception of the brass and horsehair brushes having a rotating speed of approx. 800 per minute -the normal working speed is between 2500 and 3000 rpm without using any pressure on the rotating brushes.

 

Brushing out like professionals:

Before waxing:
Brass brush: To be used before waxing for the pre-cleaning of the ski base. The recommended rotating speed is approx. 800 per minute. Please work only with single shaft with plexi hood without
using any pressure.

– After drawing (scraping) off the wax layer using the acrylic glass blade (plexi-scraper):

First step: Remaining wax is brushed out of the base using the horsehair brush. This gives the base a matte surface whereby wax-residues remain at the depth of the base structures.

Second step: The remaining wax of the base structure is brushed out using the nylon brush until
no wax particles are visible anymore. Now the base has to be polished for getting a perfect High-Glass finish.

The black nylon brush is especially suitable for polishing with optimum finish for all waxes. Can be used as a universal brush.

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Race Tuning Videos with Willi Wiltz Added to Toko Videos

5 New Race Tuning Videos Featuring Willi Wiltz Added
5 new race tuning videos featuring renowned ski and snowboard technician Willi Wiltz have been added to the TokoVideos.com.  Willi serviced Tommy Moe, Daron Rahlves, and Bode Miller to their medals and biggest successes.  Additionally, Willi has worked with snowboarders Nate Holland and Shaun Palmer with great results too.  Learn from the best at your own pace at TokoVideos.com

 

Video Index

Metal Edges (Alpine Skis and Snowboards)

Recreational/All Mountain Edge Tuning

Recreational/All Mountain Waxing

Race Tuning w/ Willi Wiltz

Race Waxing

Cross Country Skis

Recreational

Grip Waxing (Advanced)

Glide Waxing Racing Skis

Home

TokoUS.com Home

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How-To Wax a Snowboard (or skis) with Julia

Since many males have short attention spans and don’t quite grasp basic waxing, scraping and brushing concepts and techniques, we decided to show a video from Eye Handy. Hopefully, by focusing on the waxing techniques and listening to the narration, you will soon master how to keep your snowboards and skis gliding smooth and fast.

 

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Plastic Wax Scraper Sharpening

(FAQ)

Like any cutting tool, you need to keep sharp for quicker, easier & better results. Why waste the material and just toss them when they can be used for years. Having a few sharpened scrapers around is also nice when you have a lot of scraping.

A plexi-scraper works best when it’s edge is straight and smooth and the corners are sharp without burrs or jagged areas. Very much like wood, plastic can be cut and formed with a variety of methods and tools to achieve desired results:

1) A dedicated scraper sharpening guide with a file, ceramic cutters or a carbide blade.
2) Setting up a 90° dedicated or multi-angled side edge guide with a panzer or very coarse file.
3) A large, flat or panzer file secured to a bench or in a bench vise
4) Power tools: belt sander, jointer, router table, etc
5) Coarse sandpaper or drywall screen on flat surface
6) Securing a plexi-scraper in a bench vise and quickly scraping edge with sharp metal scraper

7) Or: Ski (also Snowboard) Scraper Sharpener with carbide bit for long life and fast reliable edges for production scraping and convenience.

Edited: 9/1/11

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Maplus Universal Green (old) = Red (new) & Hot White (old) = Yellow (new)

For those who grew fond of the Maplus Universal (Green) and Universal Hot (White) solid waxes in the past can rest assured that the formula, glide and durability is the same, but the colors changed over the past season and can be found here.

 

Maplus Universal (Green) is now Briko-Maplus Universal (Red)

Maplus Universal Hot (White) is now Briko-Maplus Universal Hot (Yellow)

This is also true for the Universal Fluoro and Universal Fluoro Hot series.

Description:

Economical  Universal wax. -15 to 0 degrees C (5 to 32 degrees F) and above.

Universal (red) hard, high melt paraffin snow temperature -15 to -5 degrees C. Ideal as initial base prep wax when snow temperature is cold or snow is abrasive ie. man-made snow.

Universal Hot (yellow) soft, medium melt-point paraffin glide wax for saturation and protection of ski and snowboard bases. Ideal as an initial base prep wax when snow temperature is warm, as a first wax after stone grinding base and hot scraping. Snow temperature -5 to 0 degrees C.

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Base Structure

(FAQ)

The objective of structuring is to impart grooves into the base material. This removes suction that a perfectly smooth base would produce, especially in wetter snows. The structure also channels water that is produced by the friction between the ski or snowboard base and the snow. A finer structure is desired in colder snows as it holds the smaller amount of water longer and helps the glide. Changing the structure frequently is not practical and should be done relative to major trends in the snow temperatures and time of year.

Shop base grinds with a precision machine and reliable operator can reestablish base flatness and level base edges in addition to imparting a uniform base structure. This may be your best option if your bases have had a lot of repairs, the base is out of true and numerous other reasons. The downside is that base grinds remove base material and will eventually wear down the bases. Any build up of an optimal glide from frequent waxing will also be removed and need to be recreated over time and numerous wax cycles.

Here’s a riller bar, used as a gauge, and a new ski’s factory base structure:
The home tuner can easily impart or abrade base structure with minimal base removal after base repairs, change of snow temps/season with a variety of structuring options. Coarse sandpaper, stiff metal/brass brush, Ski Visions Base Structuring tool, coarse file edge or rilling bar. Care needs to be taken to not trash the edges while structuring. Abrading the bases with coarse sandpaper, wire brushes, riller bar, saw teeth, files, etc definitely need to be cleaned up with finer sandpaper, fiber pads, scraper, etc to get rid of the ‘hairies’ and rough spots. This will reduce the initial structure depth and base impact.

After hot waxing and scraping or liquid wax applications, the structure needs to be ‘freed’ and polished to optimize the glide by brushing. Occasionally, rigorous brushing with a stiff metal brush is encouraged to freshen the structure and general cleaning.

Update: Monday, November 3, 2008 – 05:22 PM

A typical follow up question: for the cold mid-winter snow, what’s your advice for getting back a less aggressive/less coarse texture to handle the harder,dryer snow from the more aggressive/coarse spring texture I created??

Getting a base grind is the ‘correct’ method of getting your new structure and flattening your base, followed by any edge needed edge work and multiple wax cycles to resaturate the base. Perform any base repairs first.

If inclined to to do it yourself, simple DIY options (while using common sense) to reduce the structure include:
1) scraping with a sharp metal scraper or skiver
2) flat filing with a panzer/body, multicut or super coarse
3) sanding, followed by nylon fiber pad and freshening with a wire brush and/or a fine toothed rilling bar
4) using a Ski Visions base flattener and structuring tool with medium or fine structure

Preceding any of the above with a base cleaner/wax remover could be considered, but depending on how much base material removal really needed (possibly negligible), you might be better off not removing wax unless it becomes obvious. This way, you have fewer wax cycles to get your bases resaturated.

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Wax Application: Hot Waxing Basics

Cleaning and regularly waxing your bases is the most common and easiest ski and snowboard maintenance task. It will protect your boards and optimize the glide and turns.

 

Basic Hot Waxing Steps:
1) Bring the skis or snowboard to room temperature if possible.
2) Place the board(s) on a good work surface that can secure them for scraping.
3) Clean the bases with base cleaner or hot scraping.
4) Drip, crayon, hot touch & crayon or hot touch iron smear solid wax onto clean and dry base. Less wax requires less scraping, brushing & mess to clean up.
5) While keeping the iron moving, spread and melt the wax evenly over the entire base. A trail of liquid wax should just follow the iron.
6) Work the wax in again to assure coverage
7) Let the wax cool and harden for a minimum of 30 minutes.
8) Scrape wax down to base with a sharp plexi scraper to an even, thin film.
9) Free the base structure by brushing out the micro-grooves/structure of the bases and polish to a nice sheen with manual or roto brushes (or both).
10) Clean up the mess and then go glide fast and make smoother turns!

However you wax your boards, be sure to clean the bases very well and pay attention to structuring to reduce suction for better slide, especially in wetter conditions. The Maplus liquids and sprays will achieve a higher level of saturation and durability than hot waxing with solid waxes by simply applying and rubbing in with cork or felt. Saving lots of time and effort, they are easier to apply and control amounts, less or no scraping or brushing is necessary for high performance. For optimal performance, add heat by moving a iron down the ski or snowboard, over a saturation. After at least 10 minutes and the wax has hardened, polish the excess wax with horsehair or nylon brush to expose the structure. When waxing, realize that you are trying to get the wax into the base, not on the base. Scraping and brush polishing removes the excess and exposes the base structure.

HELPFUL TIPS:
-We recommend cleaning the ski or snowboard bases with Maplus detergents and then applying a hot Maplus Racing Base after each race or after preparing the ski or snowboard bases and edges.
-All traces of basic wax must be thoroughly removed before applying racing wax: scrape off the wax and then brush and polish thoroughly.
-If you clean the ski or snowboard bases with a detergent immediately before applying racing wax, we recommend heating the wax so the detergent can evaporate completely.

-We recommend the following iron temperatures to melt Maplus ski or snowboard waxes:

-120°C (248°F): Universal;
-130°C (266°F): (Soft – Soft Graphite)Racing Base, (P1-P2-P3) Hot;
-140°C (284°F): (P1-P2-P3) Med; Race Base Medium
-150°C (302°F): (P1-P2-P3) Cold;
-160°C (320°F): (Hard – Hard Graphite)Racing Base, P4.

If used improperly, the waxing iron can damage the ski or snowboard construction.

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Wax Iron vs Clothes Iron

(FAQ)

The clothes iron has always been used as a low cost method for melting and applying wax to ski & snowboard bases. An amusing irony regarding tools versus gear, is that many skiers will go to great lengths and expense to purchase performance ‘tools’ for their feet, and great lengths to spend very little for 2nd and 3rd rate tools for their hands to take care of their expensive gear, trashed day in and day out. I’ve been no different, but once you use a nice tool, irons a case in point, and realize it’ll do a better job, in less time, it’s hard to go back.

-If it’s only about cost, a conventional iron will work OK, but requires extra time, steps and attention to making sure the holes don’t retain old wax. While still warm, use a lint free towel to draw out wax and do it a again when you fire up for the next waxing.
-Wrapping with tin foil or filling the holes with JB Weld and smoothing is an option for some.
-If it doesn’t have an accurate thermostat, you’ll be guessing. If it’s smoking, it’s too hot.
-Likely end game going cheap is it’ll end up in the land fill and you’ll buy a better one later.
-Fiber pads work great for cleaning iron bases

-Better is a conventionally shaped iron without the holes, with an accurate thermostat, but still has an edge that scrapes the wax.

-Best is an iron with an “Arc” shaped iron plate which allows wax to flow to the center of the iron reducing waste and overflow with an accurate thermostat and a thick sole plate to retain consistent heat and evenly distribute wax.

Different waxes have different temperature requirements and work best when applied with recommended temperature settings.
.Many feel using a clothes iron is a Really Bad Idea, whether it’s a new or old iron. Basically, you really have no idea what temperature you’re getting, so you risk either burning the bases or not getting enough heat to get the desired wax saturation. Additionally, a clothes iron has a much broader temperature swing whereas a dedicated wax iron as much tighter temperature tolerances. You’re paying hundreds of $$$ for skis…why subject them to a cheap iron?

It can also be not hot enough and be as effective if you are too conservative guessing the temperature. Defeats the purpose somewhat if not getting complete liquefaction and flow.

Can you accurately (or care enough) to set the temperatures in this range for instance:
-We recommend the following iron temperatures to melt Maplus ski or snowboard waxes:
-120°C: Universal;
-130°C: (Soft – Soft Graphite)Racing Base, (P1-P2-P3) Hot;
-140°C: (P1-P2-P3) Med; Race Base Medium
-150°C: (P1-P2-P3) Cold;
-160°C: (Hard – Hard Graphite)Racing Base, P4.
If used improperly, the waxing iron can damage the ski or snowboard construction.

One method gauge iron temperature is whether or not the wax smokes when touched to the iron. Generally, if it’s smoking, it’s too hot for the wax and possibly the base. Never let the iron sit for any length of time on the base and keep it moving. Using a teflon sheet between iron and base helps to protect the base. Using a lint free fiber towel between base and iron can also provide some protection and draw off excess was to reduce scraping.

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Hot Touch Crayoning & Smearing Wax

To save time, wax and mess while hot waxing solids, Hot Touching is better than dripping and then ironing, especially with harder, cold waxes.

Hot Touching & Crayoning uses the least amount of solid wax, total effort, time and is the least messy. By briefly touching a bar of wax against the base of a hot waxing iron, the wax softens and is easier to apply to the base by crayoning a section of a ski or board at a time. When the crayoning becomes less effective, repeat the hot touch and crayoning until the base has a reasonably even and thin coat of wax. Then make several passes with the iron to liquify and evenly spread the wax over and into the base.

(If you are concerned with a hot iron and a very thin layer of wax on your base, using a sheet of teflon between will protect the base and make for smoother ironing.) Let cool & harden, scrape and brush. The scrapings will be minimal compared to drip/hot waxing and scraping.

Hot Touching and Smearing is similar to Crayoning. The difference is after touching the wax bar to the base, you smear the wax onto the base with the iron. This can be somewhere in between the dripand crayoning methods in both technique and amount of wax applied.

Following hot touching and smearing with a light hot scrape or fiberlene between base and iron can be comparable to crayoning requiring minimal scraping and brushing.

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Light Hot Scraping

A ‘cheat’ to include in your bag of tricks if you are in a hurry, got over zealous dripping wax while hot waxing or simply wish to reduce time, effort and mess while scraping after the wax cools and hardens, etc, is Light Hot Scraping.

After the wax cools for a minute or two, take a sharp plexi-scraper, held with even, light to moderate pressure at a 60° (+/-) angle towards you and pull down the full length of your ski or snowboard.

This should leave a relatively even, thin and smooth coat of wax.

You may also notice that the resultant semi-warm and moist scraping contains dirt, old wax or other deleterious materials, depending on prior steps.

Follow the scraping with a pass or two with your iron to re-liquify the wax and to assure that the scraping didn’t pull out the wax from the base. Let cool and harden, then scrape normally to remove the remainder and brush to free the structure. The scraping time and mess should be substantially reduced.

This is contrary to conventional wisdom and practices where hot scraping is typically a separate step with a soft wax than the application of the wax of the day. Basically, Light Hot Scraping combines the two techniques into one. It also can be additionally helpful when applying hard, cold temperature waxes, where the scraping and brushing requires much more time and effort.

Since the objective of hot waxing is to deliver wax into the base and NOT onto the base, it’s hard to imagine that this procedure would reduce the durability or performance of a given wax versus conventional practices, but it may take some experimenting to see if there is a noticeable difference or downsides, relative to ones personal goals or needs.

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Fiberlene or Shop Towels?……or Both?

(FAQ)
Fiberlene (or lint free) towels are excellent for removing dirt and old wax after using wax remover to clean the base or absorbing wax and dirt in base when placed between iron and base. It is also can be used as a final polisher and cleaner after waxing and scraping because of it’s slight abrasiveness.

Heavy duty shop towels are also durable, absorbent, readily available and handy to have around. They do not, however, stand up to heat as well as fiberlene towels. Though lower in lint (and more durable) than household paper towels, they are not ‘lint free’. If you are looking for those extra little performance enhancements, fiberlene is generally your better choice. If you are more pragmatic, the shop towels are a very good option for most cleaning tasks. If you cut the rolls in half, the 5 1/2″ (140mm) sections are a handier size and fit the width of skis and scrapers nicer.

Using heat from a temperature controlled waxing iron is one method used to reduce scraping and mess since excess wax can be absorbed. Couple that with crayoning, and you can get down to little or no scraping, depending on preferences. This also can be very helpful or desirable if you don’t have time or energy to deal with extra scraping and brushing required for hard waxes.

You could argue that it may be best to let the skis or snowboards cool so the wax hardens. Then when you reheat and use the fiberlene/wax removal approach, you might be more likely to draw the top layer of liquified wax.

This also can be used in lieu of hot scraping where theoretically, old wax, dirt and gradoo can be drawn off versus using base cleaners.

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Maplus Waxes & Thermometer

(For larger view of Racing chart , click on image.)


Universal Wax Paraffin (hydrocarbon)
Universal Solid (Cold-Hot)
Universal Solid Fluoro (Cold-Hot)
Universal Granular (Cold-Hot)
Universal Liquid
Universal Spray
Super Glide FluoroWax
Skin & Base Glide Wax
Super Glide Wax-Patterned/Scaled, aka ‘No-Wax’ Ski
Paraffin & Low fluoro products for workshop, ski-rental leisure.

Racing Base Wax Paraffin (hydrocarbon)
Racing Base Solid (Hard-Soft-Hard Graphite-Soft Graphite)
Racing Base Liquid (Hard-Soft-Hard Graphite-Soft Graphite)
High and medium melting point paraffin for saturation and protection of racing ski bases.

P1-Paraffin Wax Paraffin (hydrocarbon)
P1 Spray (Cold-Med-Hot)
P1 Liquid (Cold-Med-Hot)
P1 Solid (Cold-Med-Hot)
Paraffin for training and leisure and racing use in presence of low humidity (0% – 30%)

P2-Low fluoro Wax Paraffin (hydrocarbon)
P2 Spray (Cold-Med-Hot)
P2 Liquid (Cold-Med-Hot)
P2 Solid (Cold-Med-Hot)
P2 (Ice) Powder (Cold)
Low fluoro paraffin for training and leisure, and racing use in presence of low-medium humidity (30% -60%) or as a base before applying perfluorinated waxes P4.

P3-High fluoro Wax Paraffin (hydrocarbon)
P3 Spray (Cold-Med-Hot)
P3 Liquid (Cold-Med-Hot)
P3 Solid (Cold-Med-Hot)
P3 (Ice) Powder (Cold)
High fluoro with additive MBN7 paraffin for racing use in presence of medium-high humidity (60% – 90%) or as a base before applying perfluorinated waxes P4.

P4-Perflourinated Wax
P4 Spray (Cold-Med-Hot)
P4 Powder (Cold-Med-Hot)
P4 Solid (Cold-Med-Hot)
Perfluorinated wax to be applied on top of fluorinated paraffin products for racing use in presence of medium-very high humidity (50 – 100%).

However you wax your boards, be sure to clean the bases very well and pay attention to structuring to reduce suction for better slide, especially in wetter conditions. The Maplus liquids and sprays will achieve a higher level of saturation and durability than hot waxing with solid waxes by simply applying and rubbing in with cork or felt. Saving lots of time and effort, they are easier to apply and control amounts, less or no scraping or brushing is necessary for high performance. For optimal performance, add heat by moving a iron down the ski or snowboard, over a sheet of teflon for further saturation. After at least 10 minutes and the wax has hardened, polish the excess wax with horsehair or nylon brush to expose the structure. When waxing, realize that you are trying to get the wax into the base, not on the base. Scraping and brush polishing removes the excess and exposes the base structure.

HELPFUL TIPS:

-We recommend cleaning the ski or snowboard bases with Maplus detergents and then applying a hot Maplus Racing Base after each race or after preparing the ski or snowboard bases and edges.

-All traces of basic wax must be thoroughly removed before applying racing wax: scrape off the wax and then brush and polish thoroughly.

-If you clean the ski or snowboard bases with a detergent immediately before applying racing wax, we recommend heating the base so the detergent can evaporate completely.

-We recommend the following iron temperatures to melt Maplus ski or snowboard waxes:

-120°C (248°F): Universal;
-130°C (266°F): (Soft – Soft Graphite) Racing Base, (P1-P2-P3) Hot;
-140°C (284°F): (P1-P2-P3) Med;
-150°C (302°F): (P1-P2-P3) Cold;
-160°C (320°F): (Hard – Hard Graphite)Racing Base, P4.

If used improperly, the waxing iron can damage the ski or snowboard construction.

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Waxless XC or BC Skis Are Not

(FAQ)
Wax-less skis need glide wax: Despite what their name implies (from not needing grip or kick wax to propel the skier), the bases of wax-less skis (typically BC & XC) require some TLC as well.

Cleaning the scales and glide area to equally maintain cleanliness and sealant of bases can be achieved fairly easily for better glide and longevity. Clean the entire base with cleaner, let dry, wipe, wax, let dry 5 min., and polish. The glide area can be hot waxed for best performance but is counter productive in the kick area (scales or patterned base).

Using a spray wax on the grip/kick zone (the cut-in, patterned base or raised scale area) will improve glide, especially in warmer conditions when the snow might tend to stick and slow you down. This is probably more of an issue on single cambered BC skis, versus double camber skis, where the kick area maintains more of a continual contact with the snow.

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Putting Your Boards to Bed :-(

(FAQ)

What’s the recommended storage wax and a good procedure to prepare skis & snowboards for storage after the season?

At the end of the season or for extended periods of no use, it’s good practice to make sure your bases are covered with hydrocarbon (storage) wax to protect and seal the bases and edges. With either liquid/spray or hot waxed solids, leave unscraped to avoid drying them out and rusting the edges.

Any straight (no additives like fluoros) paraffin/hydrocarbon wax will serve the purpose of sealing bases and edges to properly put your skis into Summer hibernation. Conventional wisdom suggests a soft wax is best since it’s easier to scrape off next season. By applying a medium or universal temperature wax, you might save some effort, material, steps and time preparing next season since it is possible you can just scrape brush and go, versus scraping, brushing and reapplying, scraping and brushing the same medium or universal temperature wax next season.

First clean the base with Maplus liquid detergent Clean or Flouro clean, Kwik Citra Kleen or KUU BioCitron (Clean should be used to remove traces of paraffin, Fluoro clean should be used to remove fluorinated wax if previously applied). Make sure any rust is removed from the edges. Then use an iron to apply a solid or liquid wax like Maplus Racing Base or Universal or Universal Hot. Many prefer hot scraping versus base cleaners to insure the base is completely clean, you may scrape the wax off when still warm, then re-apply the same wax again. The trick on the final wax application is to not scrape any wax off until next season when you are ready to hit the slopes again. This “travel wax” seals and protects the base from any damage during transport and storage. It’s OK to place skis together with the bases facing each other using Maplus straps. Skis and boards, like bears prefer to hibernate in a cool, dark and dry place….and dry of the powder days, tours, turns and stellar days ahead.

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Roto vs Manual Brushing

Any roto brush expedites the brushing and overall job compared to manually brushing, tenfold, and possibly more. The benefits and considerations to get out the door quicker and easier:
-reduces the amount of scraping
-you can brush more than one ski at a time with a wider roto brush
-you can mount (2) different 10cm brushes on a 20cm shaft
-you can vary the pressure and rpms of the brush relative to wax type and desired results
-you can quickly clean the bases
-you can use a stiffer steel or brass brush for structuring
-a quick release handle is real sweet for swapping brushes

A nylon, a hard horsehair, minimally, and ideally a brass brush, along with a roto cork would cover the basics fairly well for roto-brushes. Maybe adding a felt later and others in between the range if you find the need.

Add liquid wax to the mix and, you’re out the door to ski or in bed sooner the night before and have more time for other things, with far less time and effort.

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Base Cleaning: Hot Scraping

(FAQ)

Using a soft wax (for warmer snow temp) works very well to clean the base. It pulls debris and dirt from the base when scraped off warm. Also a good idea to apply a mid temp wax as a ‘travel or storage wax’ to protect the base.

It’s good for cleaning the base, but what about the old wax? Does it have to get removed at all?

It depends if the wax used to clean the base is temperature compatible with the wax required for the conditions. If you are waxing for cold conditions you should use base cleaner, if waxing for warm it’s no problem to leave the wax on as long as its clean.

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Wax Application: Powder Glide Wax

GENERAL CONCEPTS

1. Maplus wax products offer you the choice of various combinations to suit the following chemical affinities:
-Universal, Racing Base, or P1 paraffin products on their own;
-P2 or P3 fluorinated paraffin products on their own;
-P2 fluorinated paraffin products + P4 perfluorinated waxes;
-P3 fluorinated paraffin products + P4 perfluorinated waxes;

Always start working the ski or snowboard from the tip towards the tail
2. Basic hot waxing using a Maplus Racing Base is recommended for new skis or snowboards, scratched skis or snowboards, and every time the base of the skis or snowboards have been ground. These waxes are also used to protect skis during transit or storage. The waxing iron should be set at 130°-160° C. to suit the Racing Base wax used.
3. Maplus racing waxing is required after preparing the skis as described above and should be done hot or cold to suit your specific needs, ability and experience.

STANDARD APPLICATION
1. Spread the powder wax evenly over the ski or snowboard base;

2. Melt the wax by passing the iron over it once or twice. Iron temperature: 130°-160° C. depending on the type of product being used (perfluorinated wax P4 must be rolled using a cork roller fitted on a drill and turning at between 1000 and 2000 rpm to suit the pressure applied).

3. Wait at least 10 minutes for the ski or snowboard wax to harden;

4. Remove any excess wax using a Plexiglas scraper;

5. Free the ski or snowboard base structure with a stiff manual or rotating horsehair or nylon brush;
6. Polish the ski or snowboard base structure with a soft manual or rotating horsehair or nylon brush.
Repeat the above steps for each application.

HELPFUL TIPS

-We recommend cleaning the ski or snowboard bases with Maplus detergents and then applying a hot Maplus Racing Base after each race or after preparing the ski or snowboard bases and edges.
-All traces of basic wax must be thoroughly removed before applying racing wax: scrape off the wax and then brush and polish thoroughly.
-If you clean the ski or snowboard bases with a detergent immediately before applying racing wax, we recommend heating the wax so the detergent can evaporate completely.

-We recommend the following iron temperatures to melt Maplus ski or snowboard waxes:

-120°C (248°F): Universal;
-130°C (266°F): (Soft – Soft Graphite)Racing Base, (P1-P2-P3) Hot;
-140°C (284°F): (P1-P2-P3) Med;
-150°C (302°F): (P1-P2-P3) Cold;
-160°C (320°F): (Hard – Hard Graphite)Racing Base, P4.

If used improperly, the waxing iron can damage the ski or snowboard construction.

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Wax Application: Liquid Glide Wax

GENERAL CONCEPTS

1. Maplus wax products offer you the choice of various combinations to suit the following chemical affinities:
-Universal, Racing Base, or P1 paraffin products on their own;
-P2 or P3 fluorinated paraffin products on their own;
-P2 fluorinated paraffin products + P4 perfluorinated waxes;
-P3 fluorinated paraffin products + P4 perfluorinated waxes;

Always start working the ski or snowboard from the tip towards the tail
2. Basic hot waxing using a Maplus Racing Base is recommended for new skis or snowboards, scratched skis or snowboards, and every time the base of the skis or snowboards have been ground. These waxes are also used to protect skis during transit or storage. The waxing iron should be set at 130°-160° C. to suit the Racing Base wax used.
3. Maplus racing waxing is required after preparing the skis as described above and should be done hot or cold to suit your specific needs, ability and experience.

QUICK APPLICATION

1. Spray the wax with the “pump applicator” or spread it with a paintbrush on the entire length of the ski or snowboard base;
2. Wait at least 10 minutes for the ski or snowboard wax to harden;
1. Polish the ski or snowboard base with a manual or rotating horsehair or nylon brush.

STANDARD APPLICATION

1. Spray the wax with the “pump applicator” or spread it with a paintbrush on the entire length of the ski or snowboard base and wait for the solvent to evaporate;
2. Melt the wax by passing the iron over it once or twice. Iron temperature: 130°-160° C. depending on the type of product being used);
3. Wait at least 10 minutes for the ski or snowboard wax to harden;
4. Remove any excess wax using a Plexiglas scraper;
5. Free the ski or snowboard base structure with a stiff manual or rotating horsehair or nylon brush;

6. Polish the ski or snowboard base structure with a soft manual or rotating horsehair or nylon brush;
HELPFUL TIPS

-We recommend cleaning the ski or snowboard bases with Maplus detergents and then applying a hot Maplus Racing Base after each race or after preparing the ski or snowboard bases and edges.
-All traces of basic wax must be thoroughly removed before applying racing wax: scrape off the wax and then brush and polish thoroughly.
-If you clean the ski or snowboard bases with a detergent immediately before applying racing wax, we recommend heating the wax so the detergent can evaporate completely.

-We recommend the following iron temperatures to melt Maplus ski or snowboard waxes:

-120°C (248°F): Universal;
-130°C (266°F): (Soft – Soft Graphite)Racing Base, (P1-P2-P3) Hot;
-140°C (284°F): (P1-P2-P3) Med;
-150°C (302°F): (P1-P2-P3) Cold;
-160°C (320°F): (Hard – Hard Graphite)Racing Base, P4.

If used improperly, the waxing iron can damage the ski or snowboard construction.

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Wax Application: Spray Glide Wax

GENERAL CONCEPTS

1. Maplus wax products offer you the choice of various combinations to suit the following chemical affinities:
-Universal, Racing Base, or P1 paraffin products on their own;
-P2 or P3 fluorinated paraffin products on their own;
-P2 fluorinated paraffin products + P4 perfluorinated waxes;
-P3 fluorinated paraffin products + P4 perfluorinated waxes;

Always start working the ski or snowboard from the tip towards the tail
2. Basic hot waxing using a Maplus Racing Base is recommended for new skis or snowboards, scratched skis or snowboards, and every time the base of the skis or snowboards have been ground. These waxes are also used to protect skis during transit or storage. The waxing iron should be set at 130°-160° C. to suit the Racing Base wax used.
3. Maplus racing waxing is required after preparing the skis as described above and should be done hot or cold to suit your specific needs, ability and experience.

QUICK APPLICATION

1. Spray the wax at lease 3 times to cover roughly 15 cm. of the ski base and spread immediately the liquid wax in this area using a cork or felt, rubbing and pressing. Repeat these two steps to cover the entire length of the ski or snowboard;

2. Wait at lease 10 minutes for the ski or snowboard wax to harden;

3. Polish the base with a manual horsehair or nylon brush. The base doesn’t need to be polished if used for leisure.

STANDARD APPLICATION

1. Spray the wax at least 3 times to cover roughly 15 cm. of the ski or snowboard base and spread immediately the liquid wax in the area using a cork or felt, rubbing and pressing. Repeat these two steps to cover the entire length of the ski or snowboard

(with very abrasive snow we recommend to melt the wax by passing the iron over it, once or twice, with a sheet of Teflon between the iron and the base. Iron temperature: 130°-160° C. Depending on the type of product being used);

2. Immediately roll the waxed base using a cork roller fitted on a drill and turning at between 1000 and 2000 rpm to suit the pressure applied;

3. Wait at least 10 minutes for the ski or snowboard wax to harden;

4. Free the ski or snowboard base structure with a stiff manual or rotating horsehair or nylon brush;

5. Polish the ski or snowboard base structure with a soft manual or rotating horsehair or nylon brush.
Repeat the above steps for each application.

HELPFUL TIPS

-We recommend cleaning the ski or snowboard bases with Maplus detergents and then applying a hot Maplus Racing Base after each race or after preparing the ski or snowboard bases and edges.
-All traces of basic wax must be thoroughly removed before applying racing wax: scrape off the wax and then brush and polish thoroughly.
-If you clean the ski or snowboard bases with a detergent immediately before applying racing wax, we recommend heating the wax so the detergent can evaporate completely.

-We recommend the following iron temperatures to melt Maplus ski or snowboard waxes:

-120°C (248°F): Universal;
-130°C (266°F): (Soft – Soft Graphite)Racing Base, (P1-P2-P3) Hot;
-140°C (284°F): (P1-P2-P3) Med;
-150°C (302°F): (P1-P2-P3) Cold;
-160°C (320°F): (Hard – Hard Graphite)Racing Base, P4.

If used improperly, the waxing iron can damage the ski or snowboard construction.

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Wax Application: Grip (Kick) Wax

GENERAL CONCEPTS

1. You must decide on the exact application area before applying the grip wax.
2. The length of the area to be waxed varies depending on the hardness of the ski, the weight and strength of the person and his/her individual style.
3. The central strip must never be waxed with gripping products.

As a general rule, stick and klister products should be applied in areas shown below (in centimeters):

STICK

1. Cover the area to be treated with grip wax with masking tape and then wax the rest of the ski with sliding wax (tip and tail);

2. Use a couple of strips of masking tape to mark the start and end of the gripping area to avoid applying the grip wax over the areas already waxed. Then sandpaper the area (150 or 100 grit depending on whether you use stick or klister);

3. Apply a thin layer of Orange S60 hardening base if the snow is rough. Melt this onto the skis using a waxing iron at roughly 80° C and then wait for the skis to cool for about 15 minutes.

4. Once completely cooled, spread the wax on the skis with synthetic cork (backwards and forwards);
5. Apply several layers (4-6) of the relevant wax to suit the actual skiing conditions, each time spreading it properly with synthetic cork. The amount of wax needed depends on the distance you intend to cover and the roughness of the snow.

KLISTER

1. Cover the area to be treated with grip wax with masking tape and then wax the rest of the ski with sliding wax (tip and tail);

2. Use a couple of strips of masking tape to mark the start and end of the gripping area to avoid applying the grip wax over the areas already waxed. Then sandpaper the area (150 or 100 grit depending on whether you use stick or klister);

3. Always apply a layer of Green K82 basic wax in a “herringbone” fashion. Melt this onto the ski using a waxing iron at roughly 80° C;

4. Without waiting for the ski to cool, spread the wax backwards and forwards using your thumb. Now wait for the skis to cool completely;

5. Apply one or more layers of klister (“herringbone” fashion) to suit the actual skiing conditions and using the right mix. Thumb apply;

NB: don’t apply too much or your skis may slide and grip less.

CLEANING

1. Use a paintbrush to apply the Clean detergent in the gripping area;
2. Wait 2-3 minutes for the detergent to work;
3. Remove the grip wax with a sharp scraper;
4. Repeat the above steps until all the grip wax has been removed;
1. Thoroughly clean the entire ski as for sliding waxes.

USEFUL TIPS

-Stick products can also be used to cover klister products and so avoid that these ice over (meaning the skis may lose their grip).
Wait for the skis to cool, apply the stick and then lightly and quickly smooth with synthetic cork.
-If using klister waxes at low temperatures, don’t forget to carry a portable gas flame to heat the wax, mix it and then spread it with your thumb or palm.

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