Connect & follow

Store Departments:



0 Product(s) in cart
Total $0.00

Client Login:

Login Status  Login Status
Not logged in

Newsletter Signup:


Recently Viewed:


Drilling Skis to Mount Bindings

Drilling your precious skis to mount your bindings is very straight forward and similar to drilling a multitude of materials like woods, plastics and composites.

Take your time, measure thrice and drill once. You’ll soon learn how easy and undaunted you will become.

Read More

Stainless Steel Screws for Threaded Inserts

UPDATE: We now carry Binding Freedom Low head & Small head M5 stainless steel screws.

The common question regarding the screws needed for stainless steel inserts (Binding Freedom & Quiver Killers have the same threads) and particular bindings
hopefully can be answered here. It is impossible for us to remain on top of every screw for every binding and there are variables that can be at play depending on your particular set of circumstances (ie, insert installation depth, shims, binding thickness, etc).

Read More

Boot Sole Center Gauge

The old adage “Measure Thrice, drill once” is applied to measuring, drilling and mounting bindings. A necessary part of the process is to double check ski mounting lines on both skis to verify accuracy. This step is typically overlooked when considering Boot Sole Centers.

Read More

Paper or Clear Plastic Ski Binding Templates

A very useful resource for DIY binding mounting and comparisons is paper (or clear plastic) binding templates. Not only are they great aids for accurately laying out binding holes for drilling new holes, but you can also use them to compare existing hole clearances relative to new bindings, binding combinations and discovering unknown original bindings by the hole patterns on used skis.

Read More

Finding Your Ski’s Centerline

One of the few things consistent between all of the various shapes, sizes, side wall and top sheet shapes, binding locations, and camber/rocker, etc of skis and snowboards is that they are symmetrical relative to their longitudinal centerline.

Read More

Tips & Info Sections:


Tips & Info Archives:


Recent Comments: